Who has the REAL Religious Freedom argument?

Religious freedom does not give any of us the right to discriminate against or harm others. Learn the difference between real threats to religious liberties and using religion as an excuse to attack others.

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Correct: A. As more people gain greater equality under the law, we are seeing a troubling push to allow anyone, including business owners and public officials, to use their religious beliefs as an excuse to discriminate and impose their religious beliefs on others. These efforts undermine our core American values of fairness and equality—and they are harmful, wrong and unconstitutional. Everyone, including our LGBT brothers and sisters, should be treated fairly and equally under the law.

Incorrect: B. Through comments and official correspondence, Texas Gov. Abbott, Lt. Gov., and AG Paxton have suggested that it’s ok for county clerks avoid their duty and refuse to issue licenses to same-sex couples if they held religious objections. They’re wrong. The first duty of public officials is to uphold the law, even if doing so conflicts with their personal religious convictions. And in the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, marriage equality is now the law of the land.

Our personal religious beliefs don’t give us a special exemption from following laws meant to protect everyone. Imagine what would happen if each of us could choose, according to our individual beliefs, which laws to follow and which to ignore?

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Correct: A. For many Sikhs, the turban is sacred and never removed in public. You have the right to wear a religious head covering during a security check. Security might insist on patting it down, but you still have the right to keep it on, unless security thinks there is additional cause for concern. See: https://www.aclu.org/know-your-rights/when-faced-anti-muslim-discrimination.

Incorrect: B. Under the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and Texas’ Religious Freedom Restoration Act, students’ right to wear articles of faith in school is indisputably protected. Public school officials can't prohibit students from wearing rosaries or crosses visibly at school.

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Correct: A. As more people gain greater equality under the law, we are seeing a troubling push to allow anyone, including business owners and public officials, to use their religious beliefs as an excuse to discriminate and impose their religious beliefs on others. These efforts undermine our core American values of fairness and equality—and they are harmful, wrong and unconstitutional. Everyone is entitled to his or her own religious beliefs, but that does not mean, and has never meant, that businesses—including pharmacists—can use religion as an excuse to deny a woman birth control or other reproductive health care needs.

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Correct: A. Students in school have a right to pray or share messages expressing their religious beliefs alone or with friends at any time that does not disrupt classes—even when that speech is by students as young as elementary schoolchildren. However, schools cannot require students to participate in prayer or organize prayer activities, and all prayer in school must be student-initiated. Students have the right to pray in school. Schools and school officials do not have the right to coerce students into praying in school.

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Correct. A. Under the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and Texas’ Religious Freedom Restoration Act, students’ right to wear articles of faith in school is indisputably protected. That includes the right of a Native American elementary school student to wear his hair in the manner consistent with his religious beliefs.

Incorrect. B. No, Texas State Board of Education, this is just wrong-headed and stupid. See http://tfn.org/whats-in-the-proposed-new-texas-textbooks-we-got-democracy-from-moses/ and http://tfn.org/no-the-constitution-isnt-founded-on-the-ten-commandments/

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Correct: A. Equality and religious freedom are our bedrock values. They are enshrined in our Constitution and are not mere formalities to be discarded in difficult times. Yet recently, we have seen a politics of fear used to justify discrimination against Muslims. This has resulted in unwarranted surveillance, unlawful profiling, and exclusionary immigration policies targeting people based on their faith, nationality, or national origin. Targeting mosques and the free expression of religion is just plain wrong and unconstitutional. In the U.S., you have the right to practice your faith freely, and you are protected against government intrusion into matters of faith.
https://www.aclu.org/feature/anti-muslim-discrimination

Take Action: Tell Texas leaders religion should never be used to discriminate against or harm others.